Drug Facts

With so many voices and opinions out there, it’s important to understand the facts.

Fact is that while you’re a teen (and even into your early 20′s!), you’re still growing and developing, and drug abuse during these years in particular can have a lasting impact. Another fact to consider: the brain is much more vulnerable to addiction as it continues to develop as well. 90% of Americans with a substance abuse problem starting smoking, drinking or using other drugs before age 18. 

When it comes to drug use, individual reactions and experiences vary, so it’s important to understand the usual risks and effects, both short- and long-term. Knowledge can be the key to making your own best decisions.

Keep reading to the get the facts on the most frequently abused substances.

Alcohol
Bath Salts
Cocaine
DXM
GHB
Hallucinogens
Heroin
Inhalants
Ketamine
LSD
Marijuana
MDMA
Meth
Mushrooms
Over-the-Counter
Prescription Drugs
Rohypnol
Salvia
Spice
Steroids
Tobacco & Nicotine
Select Drug

Rohypnol

Dangerous when taken on its own, and fatally dangerous when combined with alcohol, Rohypnol is horrifyingly infamous for being the “date-rape drug.”

AKA

Forget-me pill, Mexican valium, R2, roche, roofies, roach, rope, wolfies

What is it?

Rohypnol is a central nervous system (CNS) depressant medication that is not approved or available for medical use in the United States. In this country, it is abused for its sedative and muscle-relaxant effects.1
Because of these effects, it has been associated with sexual assaults and is known as the “date-rape drug.”

The Risks

Rohypnol slows down the central nervous system, causing a range of effects, including exhaustion, sedation, confusion, impaired coordination, impaired judgment and memory loss. Use it, and you can become physically and psychologically incapacitated, meaning you’re unable to move or think—or you’re knocked out. This is why it has been used in targeting people for sexual assault.1 In the past, it was easy to slip the drug into a drink, because it was colorless and tasteless. In 1997, the drug was reformulated so that when dissolved in light-colored drinks, it will dye the liquid blue. Still, be forewarned: generic versions of Rohypnol may not contain this blue dye.1

 

Long-Term Effects

Rohypnol is lethal when combined with alcohol or other drugs. It can slow the pulse and breathing, leading to unconsciousness, slowed heart rate, suppressed breathing and, ultimately, death.

The Bottom Line

With the extreme damage it can cause to your central nervous system, the effects of Rohypnol can quickly put you in danger, and even turn lethal.

 

Sources
  1. U.S. Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Agency. Drugs of Abuse: Rohypnol.
    Retrieved August 2011.
    View Source

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